Sam Axelrod ‘16 Performs with Brooklyn-Based Future of What

Future of What is made up of Max Kotelchuck, Sam Axelrod, and Blair Gimma. Photo Credit: Maia McDonald

Future of What is made up of Max Kotelchuck, Sam Axelrod, and Blair Gimma.
Photo Credit: Maia McDonald

Sam Axelrod (’16), who is often in the library’s quiet room during the school week when he is not in class, can also be found moonlighting in Brooklyn band Future of What, which recently put out their first album on Jan. 13. Pro Dreams, which debuted at #61 on the CMJ top 200, was streamed before its release on Consequence of Sound. Now, it is available on their Bandcamp, Spotify, and iTunes

Future of What is a trio comprised of Axelrod, Blair Gimma, and Max Kotelchuck, who have been performing together since 2012. Their sound is somewhere between dream pop, synth pop, and electro pop. When asked to describe it to someone who is both blind and deaf, Axelrod hesitatingly said the band tasted like “mango sorbet” or “maybe a piña colada.” The press release for Pro Dreams says the album is “for daytime and nighttime. It’s a makeout record and a breakup record. It’s headphone music for a walk or a train ride. It’s a getting-ready-for-work album as much as a getting-ready-to-go-out record. Casual enough to listen to while cleaning the house, yet emotional enough to die to.” 

Axelrod, who commutes to Sarah Lawrence from Brooklyn three times a week, came to SLC through the Center of Continuing Education in January of 2012.  Axelrod says, “2011 was the first year in my life I wasn’t playing in a band since about the mid-nineties.” Axelrod met Gimma through mutual friends after having liked her solo album from 2010, Die Young, which she made under the eponymously titled project, Blair. Kotelchuck, whom Axelrod knew through his sister, joined what was slowly becoming a group project soon after. 

Axelrod was previously in Chicago-based band The Narrator from 2002 until 2008. The two albums The Narrator put out, All That To The Wall (2007) and Such Triumph (2005), scored a 7.2 and a 7.5 on Pitchfork respectively. 

Axelrod says it was “the right time” to come to SLC in 2012. “I had been encouraged to check out the continuing education program. I wasn’t thinking like, ‘I am going back to school.’ I just was going to try it, so I went to the orientation in November, and by January I was enrolled in classes. It was right at the same time I started playing in Future of What.”

Though he takes primarily writing classes, Axelrod has also taken literature classes, history classes, and psychology classes. Pro Dreams’ opener, “The Rainbowed Air” is named after a line from Moby-Dick by Herman Melville. “I tried to read Moby-Dick in 2007 when I was on tour in Japan with [The Narrator] and I just couldn’t get through it. I took a summer class with Ilja Wachs in CCE and I read Moby-Dick for conference.”  Axelrod says he is more of a stickler for song titles than his bandmates. “Songs go through various stages,” says Axelrod. “Some songs get names before they even necessarily deserve one. That can go on to dictate the lyrics or the vibe of the song.” 

Future of What also struggled to come up with a band name while recording their 2012 EP Moonstruck, very shortly after they had started playing. Axelrod says, “We couldn’t agree on anything and I was sitting there in the studio going through my iPod, looking for words and phrases I liked. I gave the ones I picked out to Blair, and Future of What was the one we picked.” 

Though they have a Blue Room show in the works, Future of What has played SLC before. In 2013, they played 4/20 Fest to “five people” on the South Lawn. “It was supposed to be on the North Lawn,” Axelrod explains, “but it was moved under a tent on the South Lawn because it was supposed to rain. But it turned out to be 72 and sunny and everyone hung out on the North Lawn and would only walk over when their friends played. We had no friends.” 

Future of What are expecting a bigger crowd at their album release party, which will be Feb. 8 at Baby’s All Right in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. 

By Sarah McEachern ‘17

SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

Career Corner, for Advice on Life After College: Simon and Schuster Site Visit

Sarah Lawrence students and Career Services faculty pose for a group photo at the Simon & Schuster headquarters. Photo Courtesy SLC Career Services.

Sarah Lawrence students and Career Services faculty pose for a group photo at the Simon & Schuster headquarters. Photo Courtesy SLC Career Services.

After selecting my interests on my Sarah Lawrence College Career Link profile, I received an email inviting me to a site visit at the publishing company Simon & Schuster. As publishing has always been a career that sounded interesting to me, a behind-the-scenes sneak peak seemed like the perfect way to learn more. 
 
Walking into the large lobby of Simon & Schuster’s headquarters, just off of Fifth Avenue, made it easy to envision and get excited about the possibility of a career there. After being escorted upstairs, we all sat down around a large table in one of their conference rooms and were introduced to two employees, and SLC alums, Sophia Jimenez BA (‘12) and Tatiana Ruiz-Cornejo MFA (‘13).

My dreams of working in publishing as an excuse to read books all day long were quickly shattered by Jimenez. She works in the editorial department, and explained that it’s not all chai teas and good reads. “You don’t get a lot of time to read at work,” she said. “I spend a lot of my day answering emails and dealing with various other parts of the books process and the time for editing comes after work. I actually get a lot of it done during my commute.”
 
As I heard more about the industry, I began to build a more three-dimensional image of what working in publishing is really like. Ruiz-Cornejo, who works in the publicity department, explained, “Publicity reaches out to reviewers and critics to get your New York Times or your Boston Globe to review the book, and then also works on setting up events for the book.”
 
While authors may seem a difficult breed to work with, Ruiz-Cornejo deals directly with authors whose attitudes break that stereotype. She was especially surprised by “how nice the authors are. They are always in contact with me asking me who their readers are and how they can get more readers.” 
 
An obvious deciding factor to see whether a career is right for you is whether or not you have the skills necessary to be successful and enjoy that field. The advice for top skills to have in publishing from the pro: “Time management and being detail oriented, while being able to look at the big picture,” said Jimenez. “You have to be diplomatic as well because you do a lot of interacting with authors.”

Jeffrey Salane, who works in Little Simon, Simon & Schuster's children’s department, talked about the exciting and rewarding aspects of his job which include: “taking a manuscript, finding an illustrator that will lift the book to the next level and getting to work with a lot of strong creative people. Its kind of the bees knees.”

I left feeling inspired by the enthusiasm of those who spoke to us but also unsure if a career in publishing is right for me. It just didn’t feel right. No matter, at least I’m one feeling closer to finding a career that I love. 

by Mary Katherine Michiels-Kibler ’17
mmichiels@gm.slc.edu

SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

MEET THE EDITORS: Who's Who on The Phoenix?

photo-2.JPG

Wade Wallerstein (’17) is a 19-year-old sophomore at Sarah Lawrence College who is currently studying journalism and digital media. He is the Phoenix’s Editor-in-Chief.

This summer, Wade worked at the mall near his hometown of Los Gatos, CA, which is about 45 minutes south of San Francisco. He spent much time walking along the beach of Northern California, climbing trees, and watching bad movies on Netflix. For two weeks he went to Puerto Rico in efforts to get tan and instead just got burned.

This summer, Wade read F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby,” which he finished quickly in order to start “A Storm of Swords,” the third book in George R. R. Martin’s “A Song of Fire and Ice” series (for those of you who don’t know, that means “Game of Thrones”).

In his spare time, Wade enjoys writing about rap music, laying in grassy areas, compulsively eBay-shopping, and watching videos of ocean creatures. You can follow him on Instagram: @boyratchet, and Twitter: @b0yratchet.

 

 

 

 

Julia Schur (’15) is an international student from Paris, France who moved to New York City in 2012. She is the Phoenix’s Managing Editor.

During the summer, Julia worked on a schizophrenic range of topics. Starting off in June she became an editor at RESPECT. Magazine, which led her to delve deeper into the hip-hop world. She also has been juggling studying for the LSAT. Traveling throughout the summer between Paris, Rhode Island, Boston and New York, her constant companion was “Hard Choices” by Hillary Clinton. You can follow Julia on Twitter: @juliahlna




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah McEachern (’17) is the Phoenix’s Print Managing Editor and hails from just near Minneapolis. Her midwestern accent means that she says ‘bag’ funny and calls soda-pop simply ‘pop.’

Sarah returned to Minneapolis over the summer and worked the entire time, with only a brief reprieve to go to the cabin. When she wasn’t working, she was reading. Some of the books Sarah read over the summer were “To Kill A Mockingbird,” “A Moveable Feast, Nine Stories, I Will Never Be Beautiful Enough to Make Us Beautiful Together, Norwegian Wood, The Unaccustomed Earth” by Jhumpa Lahiri, “Drown, Raise High the Roof beams Carpenters and Seymour: an Introduction,” and “The Girl with Curious Hair.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nabila Wirakushmah (’17) is the Phoenix’s Web Editor.

She spent her summer in 10 cities and different countries before realizing she probably should have planned for a little more downtime. After spending barely four days at home in Hong Kong, she took off for SLC's Summer Arts in Berlin program where she studied drawing, art history and architectural theory. Once the program was over, she explored Brussels and Amsterdam before heading back to Hong Kong for two weeks to meet up with two of her best friends from SLC and show them around the city and its neighboring country, Macau.

 

The end of July marked the end of the holy month of Ramadan, and on the 28th Nabila and her family went to Jakarta to celebrate Idul Fitri. After all the celebrations, they traveled to Bali for three weeks of diving, taking several small trips to and from Lovina, Ubud and Gili Trawangan to experience the part of Indonesia they missed out on while living abroad.

At the start of the summer, Nabila had written out a whole reading list for herself. However, she regrettably only got ‘round to reading one book on the list: Chris Brogan's “The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth.” The book is a guide to entrepreneurship for those who don't quite fit in. She also reread “Kitchen” by Banana Yoshimoto for the fourth time, even though it was not on her list.

 

 

 

Janaki Chadha (’17) is the Phoenix’s News Editor.

Over the summer, Janaki went back to her hometown of Berkeley Heights, New Jersey. She interned with the NYC-based organization The Poetry Society of New York, where she mostly worked on social media outreach, and spent most of her free time reading, writing and eating home-cooked food.

During the summer, Janaki read a lot of different things. She read Junot Diaz's collection, “This is How You Lose Her," lots of Joan Didion, including “Play It As It Lays,” “Middlesex,” by Jeffrey Eugenides, “A Bend in the River” and “A House for Mr. Biswas” by V. S. Naipaul, and she finally finished Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov.


 

 

 

 

MaryKatherine Michiels-Kibler (’17), or simply MK, is from San Francisco but also frequently finds herself in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. She is the Phoenix’s Features Editor.

MK enjoyed cheering on team FURY at the World Championships of Ultimate Frisbee in Lecco, Italy over the summer. She also enjoyed exploring Berlin with her mom, flying airplanes upside down with her dad, and taking seven kids to Yosemite National Park with her friends.

MK enjoys reading The Week, a magazine that is essentially a cheat sheet to all politics, gossip and current events happening in the world. She finds it useful when wanting to sound like she read many articles when she really only read one.


 

 

 

 

 

Colette Harley (’17) is the Phoenix’s Sports Editor. She is made mostly of avocados, chlorine and caffeine.

This summer Colette read most of David Foster Wallace’s short essays, “East of Eden” by John Steinbeck, “Taipei” by Tao Lin, “I Love Dick” by Chris Kraus, and re-read “Catcher in the Rye.” Colette is currently working on understanding her feelings about Wallace and might just get around to reading “Moby Dick” by Herman Melville.

When she wasn’t hanging out in Connecticut, she was working in Bronxville. The most notable part of her summer was a pilgrimage to JD Salinger’s house in Cornish, New Hampshire with Print Editor Sarah McEachern (’17).

You can follow her on twitter @intensechoobism

 

 

 

Baldwin Virgin (’17) is from Montclair, New Jersey, where she resides with her parents, younger brother and poodle mix. She is the Phoenix’s Perspectives Editor.

Baldwin worked for Pixie Market as their lead social media intern this summer before continuing on to working for designer Prabal Gurung as a Public Relations intern.

Baldwin’s love of writing can most likely be attributed to her writer mother and literary namesake, James Baldwin. Her love for fashion has been with her since diaper days, but is probably due to the InStyle subscription she received on her eighth birthday.

Her favorite books include “The Human Stain” by Philip Roth, “Dirty Love” by Andre Dubus III, and “My Misspent Youth,” a collection of essays by Meghan Daum.

When she is not shopping her closet or gallivanting around the city, she can be found in her basement watching Sex and the City reruns. Baldwin hopes to be a fashion journalist one day and believes that any woman can conquer the world in a black tuxedo blazer.

 

 

 

Toya Singh (’15) grew up in New Delhi, India, Sydney, Australia,  and Manila, Philippines. She is the Phoenix’s Social Media Editor.

Most recently she shifted to Irving, Texas, where she spent her summer doing the classic American pastimes that are visiting the grocery store, pretending she would one day hit the gym, and going to that one mall again and again.

Over the summer, she read Haruki Murakami’s “The Windup Bird Chronicle” and J.D. Salinger’s “Franny and Zooey. After discovering the “Irreverent” genre tag on Netflix, Toya is proud to say that she watched every single episode of every season of “Freaks and Geeks, “The Office,” “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia,” “Sex and the City,
“Louie,” “Parks and Recreation,” and “That 70’s Show.” She tried “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” but it just really, really, really wasn’t meant to be.

 

 

 

 

Julia Hodgkinson (‘15) is a senior from Vancouver, Canada. She studies largely in the Environmental Studies and Economics departments during her years at SLC, and she keeps up her Spanish too. She is the Phoenix’s Copy Editor.

This summer, Julia lived in Brooklyn and interned with the Climate Initiative at the Clinton Foundation. Her research focus there was largely on renewable energy development in island nations. On weekends, Julia could be found firmly planted with iced-coffee in Fort Greene Park reading the Economist, while most likely on the phone (with her mother). This summer she read “Hard Choices” by Hillary Clinton, and she re-read “Guns, Germs, and Steel” and “Collapse” by Jared Diamond.  Julia really enjoys eating, talking, and traveling, but she loves the ocean(s).

 

 

 

 


 

Kathy Wielgosz (’17) is a sophomore focusing on literature and she is interested in pursuing publishing after school. She is the Phoenix’s Copy Editor.

Kathy spent her summer working retail and volunteering at her local library in her hometown of Woodridge, Illinois, a small suburb of Chicago. During her free time, she re-read her favorite book, “Good Omens” by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, and finally started reading the “Lord of the Rings” series, which she admittedly should have read years ago.

She spent the last week of her summer break visiting Williamsburg, Virginia and Washington, D.C. before returning to Sarah Lawrence. She can often be found working at the SLC library or procrastinating by cross-stitching while watching Netflix. Her current binge show is “Arrow,” which she finds delightfully cheesy.

 

 

 

 

 

Shelby Krog (’17) is a sophomore focusing on a degree in both veterinary medicine as well as journalism. She has a focus to work for National Geographic and has been published in the New York Times as well as the Sun Sentinel and Miami Herald. She is the Phoenix’s Copy Editor.

During the summer, Shelby spent her time between California (mostly San Francisco area) and South Florida, working both as a trainer and care taker at Barker’s Pet Resort  as an assistant to a marketing executive for Netflix and HBO-go.

In her free time, Shelby volunteers at pet shelters, writes poetry, and engages in fiery social and political conversations with her friends. She loves to read, and most recently finished “Jitterbug Perfume” by Tom Robbins and “Pillars of the Earth” by Ken Follett. You can follow Shelby on Instagram: @skroggy.


SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

"That's an all-girls school, right?" Michiels-Kibler tackles the classic misconception

Veterans permitted to attend SLC prior to the college's decision to go co-ed contemplate course offerings  on the steps of Westlands in 1946. Photo courtesy Sarah Lawrence College Archives from the Sarah Lawrence Alumnae/i Magazine.

Veterans permitted to attend SLC prior to the college's decision to go co-ed contemplate course offerings  on the steps of Westlands in 1946. Photo courtesy Sarah Lawrence College Archives from the Sarah Lawrence Alumnae/i Magazine.

“That’s an all girl’s school. Right?” I have been asked this question countless times since deciding to attend Sarah Lawrence College. For a school that became coeducational at the same time as just about every other originally women’s college (Vassar and Skidmore, for example), SLC has retained its image as an all female institution and enrollment has continued to be uneven (72 percent female to 28 percent male according to the Princeton Review).

When Sarah Lawrence College first opened in 1928 its mission was to prepare young women for society. After the difficult financial times of the war, and under the GI Bill, the college allowed a select number of veterans to attend. Then, in 1968, after much controversy, the board of directors decided to allow men to officially enroll in the college; however, the administration never publicly announced this decision.

In the March 1975 issue of The SLC Tribune (The Phoenix's precursor as the campus newspaper), only seven years after becoming coed, the paper reported a male-to-female ratio of one male to every three females. In the article, students debated whether the school should start more actively recruiting men or go back to being all female.

Sarah Lawrence women Marjorie Rile '41, Dorothy "Dot" Hodge '41, and Jo Hill '41 play pool with their dates during a Sunday tea dance in 1938 . Photo courtesy Sarah Lawrence College Archives from the 1938-39 SLC Yearbook.

Sarah Lawrence women Marjorie Rile '41, Dorothy "Dot" Hodge '41, and Jo Hill '41 play pool with their dates during a Sunday tea dance in 1938 . Photo courtesy Sarah Lawrence College Archives from the 1938-39 SLC Yearbook.

The article also discussed how the ratio affected the social scene of the school, and listed possible reasons for the college’s continued all female reputation as such: “Male candidates believe that SLC still holds the reputation of being an all-women’s college. The name helps this impression linger on. Most men who decide to go to college choose a school with stronger emphasis on the sciences and more defined job-oriented programs.” It also asserted that SLC is not “a competitively oriented school.” Why do we still have this reputation 40 years later?

photo courtesy Sarah Lawrence College Archives

photo courtesy Sarah Lawrence College Archives

Three male first-years all agreed that they were aware of the male female ratio and reputation as an all girls school prior to attending Sarah Lawrence, but that it did not affect their decision to enroll.

Another first-year commented: “I took into consideration the curriculum and the academics of the school along with the fact that I would be playing sports here,” said Varun Kelkar ‘18, “so it didn’t really bother me that there would be more girls than guys. It was definitely more of a culture shock when I got here, but I never felt out of place.”  

Renee Lemmel ’17 added, “People are always [asking], ‘is that an all girls school? I’m like, well, technically no, but there are still so many girls compared to guys that it may as well be.” As for the social scene, Lemmel commented: “Girls are always like, ‘well he is the only viable candidate out of the few’.”

To avoid feelings of annoyance at the repetition of this question my recommendation is to come up with an amusing answer to say when correcting this common misconception.

by Mary Katherine Michiels-Kibler '17
Features Editor
mmichiels@gm.slc.edu
 

 

 

 

Welcome to your new home! Take a tour of SLC's residence halls

photo courtesy Ellie Brumbaum '17

photo courtesy Ellie Brumbaum '17

One of the most annoying things that Sarah Lawrence fails to inform incoming students about is dormitory situations. They tell you what room you will be living in and how many roommates you will have, but there is no real way to see the space that you will be living in. Never fear! The Phoenix is here with a photo tour of Sarah Lawrence residences! We've included photos of as many of the dorms that incoming students will occupy as possible—many of which have students in them to help you visualize yourselves in your new homes. Welcome to SLC, folks!

Hill House

Hill House dorms are apartment style. All have kitchens, bathrooms, and multiple bedrooms. While some have common rooms, some do not. 

New Dorms (Rothschild, Garrison, & Tweed)

New dorms are closer to the traditional dormitory style of most college campuses. These buildings are modern with rooms lining both sides of long hallways. These rooms are non-adjoining and have their own closets. While Rothschild has apartments similar to those of Hill House with their own bathrooms, Garrison and Taylor have communal bathrooms at the end of each hallway.

Old Dorms (MacCracken, Titsworth, Dudley Lawrence, & Gilbert)

It's hard to capture the charm of these residence halls. They are old, but full of stories. Each room is a slightly different shape. The pictures above come from Titsworth, the all female building, but Dudley Lawrence, MacCracken, and Gilbert (substance free housing) are similar. Unlike the new dorms, theThere are no hall bathrooms in these buildings: instead, rooms are paired together with bathrooms that connect them. This means that you only share a bathroom with your roommates and the residents of the room next to yours. 

Westlands

Ellie Brumbaum

Ellie Brumbaum

The residence hall in Westlands has some of the most unique rooms on campus. They feature all wood floors and funky architecture that makes for cozy corners and excellent study spaces. This hall is substance free, quiet housing and has communal hall bathrooms.

Lynd

Lynd is, in my opinion, the most beautiful dorm on campus. Many of the rooms used to shelve books for the mansion that Lynd was converted from. This dorm is famously known as the "Yoko Ono Dorm" because she lived here during her time at SLC. It has beautiful mahogany wood paneling and flooring, and is right across from Sarah Lawrence's green house.


by Wade Wallerstein
Editor-in-Chief
wwallerstein@gm.slc.edu
twitter: b0yratchet
ig: boyratchet

 

SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

Nervous about moving in? Here's what you should bring for the best move-in day ever

photo courtesy Chris Taggart

photo courtesy Chris Taggart

We are quickly approaching the excitement of Move-In Day – a day that can seem daunting when facing the challenging task of deciding what to pack. “You don’t need to bring as much as you think you do,” explained Connor Simcox ‘16, “you want to bring a bunch of books from home because they look nice or you want to read them, but you only ever end up flipping through one or two.” Within the first few weeks of school your book collection will have doubled, adapting to your new tastes and your curriculum. “Just bring the books that might work well as reference material,” he said.

It is important that you acclimate yourself easily to your new home, and to do so you should bring familiar objects with you. “Things I was happiest to have brought were things from my childhood, like books that I had already read, my dad’s pillows or a pair of my mom’ socks, just to remind me that I was home,” said Aly Tippett ‘16.

You should buy tape to stick things on your walls that remind you of home (tacks are not allowed). “Bring photographs of your family, of your friends, of your pets, and of the neighborhood café that was the site of so many high school study sessions. Keep those people and those places with you. They are your foundation, they are what brought you to who, and where you are now,” said Sophie Needleman ‘16

You will also need a few essentials to make your life a little easier throughout the year. “Shower shoes for communal bathrooms and a robe will save your life,” said Katya Goncalves ‘16. In addition, bring “a fan, and slippers so you can walk around comfortably,” said Tippett. The beds at Sarah Lawrence are twin-sized, so bring a comforter, bed linens and two pillows sized for your new bed. Your new room will be smaller than what you are accustumed to, so you have to make the most out of the little space you have. Bring clothing hangers for your closet, bed risers and storage containers for your shoes and some of your clothes to nicely sit under your bed. Some of the rooms are not furnished with lamps, so try to bring a desk lamp and a larger lamp. The desk lamp will come in handy when you will need to work late nights and your roommate is sleeping and the larger lamp will bring some warmth to your new home. Typically, the lamps that the school gives you (if you have one in your room) will have a bright white light that is disagreeable. We recommend you bring yellow-tinted light bulbs to bring a comforting glow to your room.  Add to the list a full length mirror and a rug. The rug will make your room more cozy. If you live in the new dorms where the floors are bare and quickly get dirty, a rug is essential. If you live in Hill House, most rooms have a carpet thus a rug will not be necessary. You should also bring an over-the-door hanger; it is a great way to save space and a practical spot to keep your coat, robe and towel. To maximize space in your bathroom, you should bring a shower rack to easily transport everything you need.

Laundry will probably be the more challenging task as a freshman, but you will only need two things: detergent and a small laundry bag that you can easily carry up and down stairs. Try to buy one large case of detergent with your roommates, you will always end up borrowing each others.

When it comes to school supplies, do not forget to bring a hard drive or a small USB stick (depending on how much storage space you need) to backup your work. You do not want to risk losing all your notes and homework during conference week. The school’s bookstore sells binders, folders, paper and writing utensils but you should only use the bookstore for things that are urgent because it can be quite pricey. You can also splurge on some Sarah Lawrence merchandise if you want to; however, there is a Staples near campus that offers more choices for a better value. You also do not need to bring your own printer. Printers are available in almost every dorm. You can also print in the library, at the Pub, in Heimbold, or Slonim. On your first day, you will receive a lot of “printing money”  on your One-Card. This money does not roll-over from year to year, so make the most of it (in other words, use it all!). For late night studying do not forget to bring a coffee mug. Refills at the pub will be less expensive and it is ultimately better for the environment to use a mug instead of paper cups.

If you are feeling overwhelmed, remember that it is “better to under pack than to over pack, as the year goes by you will have a better idea of what you need. You can build off that,” said Ramisha Sumar ‘15. You also happen to live five minutes away from both Cross County Shopping Center and downtown Bronxville where you will be able to purchase almost anything that you need. Most importantly remember to “bring your big heart and bring your wisdom,” said Needleman. Within your first few hours you will meet a lot of people who are willing to help you get anything you might need. If your parents are not with you to help, most likely one of your roommates will have a parent that is more than willing to help you get everything you need, from additional storage space to food. The biggest move-in essential is a calm mind and positive attitude.

by Julia Schur '15
Managing Editor
jschur@gm.slc.edu

 

SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.