A Taste of Paradise

Puerto Rico. Credit: Ariela Brody ‘16

Puerto Rico. Credit: Ariela Brody ‘16

As the harsh winds of winter set in, the all-encompassing cold brings with it daydreams of sun dappled palm trees and warm ocean breezes. Though spring break seems far away and visions of the tantalizing tropics seem unattainable, with a little fiscal management and a lot of planning the vibrant island of Puerto Rico could be in your future.

The first step to achieving a tropical vacation is the purchase of a plane ticket. While this step is by far the most expensive and stressful, technology now offers some ways to cheat the system and find a ticket in your price range. The first rule is never travel when it is most convenient for everyone else. The cheapest tickets will always be for the most inconvenient times, whether that means during the nighttime, during the week, or the least popular part of spring break. When it comes time to purchase a plane ticket that follows all those guidelines be sure to look for your ticket under the incognito browsing option. Travel sites that offer discount tickets are able to track how many times you visit the site allowing them to hike the prices of the tickets they display to you when they can tell you are interested. Last but not least, my personal secret is the website hipmunk.com; this site compares multiple different flight deals, not only helping you find the cheapest offer but also the best airlines.

Now that you have a toolbelt of airline tricks, I will now try to persuade you on your destination. What if I told you there was an island only three hours away with an entirely different language, the only tropical rainforest in the United States, and warm sandy white beaches galore? Overlooked in past years, Puerto Rico is the ideal destination for those with not much money in their pocket but a great, adventurous spirit.
Whether or not you make it to Puerto Rico, recreate some paradise with the island’s answer to egg nog: coquito.

Makes About 7 Cups
Prep time: 5 min.
Total time: 5 min., plus chilling time
Ingredients
2 cans (12 oz. each) Evaporated Milk
1 can (15 oz.) Cream of Coconut
1 can (13.5 oz.) Coconut Milk
½ cup Sweetened Condensed Milk
½ cup white rum (optional)
1 tsp. vanilla extract
½ tsp. ground cinnamon, plus more for garnish, if desired
Cinnamon sticks (optional)

Directions
1.  In bowl or blender, add evaporated milk, cream of coconut, coconut milk, sweetened condensed milk, rum (if using), vanilla extract, and ground cinnamon. Blend on high until mixture is well combined, 1-2 minutes.
2.  Pour coconut mixture into glass bottles; cover. Transfer to refrigerator. Chill until cold.
3.  To serve, stir or shake bottle well to combine. Pour coquito into small serving glasses. Garnish with ground cinnamon and cinnamon sticks, if desired.

By Ariela Brody ‘16

abrody@gm.slc.edu

SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

Is Burke's Restaurant and Bar the new go-to for Sarah Lawrence Students?

Burke's Restaurant and Bar has become increasingly frequented by Sarah Lawrence students this semester, garnering special events such as last week's Beer Pong Tournament. The winning team received a $100 bar tab credit. Photo by Ariela Brody.

Burke's Restaurant and Bar has become increasingly frequented by Sarah Lawrence students this semester, garnering special events such as last week's Beer Pong Tournament. The winning team received a $100 bar tab credit. Photo by Ariela Brody.

Located on 645 Bronx River Road, not far from Fleetwood Plaza, Burke’s Restaurant and Bar is the new destination for broke Sarah Lawrence students running out of drinking and dining options. Still relatively undiscovered, this Irish pub offers food and beverages on a budget with unbelievable discounts to students-- including their famous 8 dollar Mac and Cheese! By simply showing your SLC ID you can get everything from a 20 percent discount to free food.

Originally starting off their campaign to attract more college students with simple discounts, they have escalated to more enticing offers, most recently a $15, open bar on Saturdays from 10 p.m. to midnight. In addition to the open bar, there are $4 fireball shots and free burgers on Wednesday nights from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

While other colleges have multiple local hangouts, SLC has never had a go-to bar of its own. Burke’s, which is currently populated by locals, is surprisingly eager to add SLC students to the mix. The locals welcome SLC students as well as those from Iona College seeking some variety.

“People aren’t loving the open bar, people don't expect that they will drink that much. They would rather buy one beer at a time.” said Hayley Adams (‘15), SLC student and bartender at the establishment. According to her, the deals offered at Burke’s are surprisingly not taken advantage of that often. While the $15 open bar comes in handy, those that first enter the bar never believe it will be worth their while. Instead, choosing to take it one beer at a time, they run a tab larger than expected. For those that do not drink, Burke’s casual cuisine also comes at a steal every day of the week with a unique SLC discount of 20 percent off.

Those who have taken advantage of Burke’s open bar opportunities have also been greeted with additional surprises. Martin Blondet (‘16) recently won a free open bar, to be claimed any Friday or Saturday of his choice with an additional 50 percent discount for friends. Only a slightly farther walk than Kay’s, Burke’s Restaurant and Bar is a reasonable trek for mind-blowing prices. If prices are not enough of a motivation, the bar will begin to feature DJs from Sarah Lawrence this upcoming month!

by Ariela Brody '16
abrody@gm.slc.edu

 

BRODY'S RECIPES: Two easy, dorm-friendly recipes, no kitchen required!

With many dorms on campus lacking access to a full kitchen, it can be a hassle to feed yourself without submitting to the wrath of Bates. The heat wave this past week has only made the idea of toiling away in a steamy kitchen all the more unappetizing. While the gazpacho requires a blender and the granola bars require a microwave, neither recipe involves being a slave to the kitchen and can be accomplished in the comfort of your dorm room. If you can work up enough courage, for extra air-conditioned comfort, I have recently witnessed someone wielding a blender in the Pub. Though I am not sure how advisable that is, their ingenuity was admirable. The recipes below are perfect for the broke student on the go. All the ingredients can be found close to campus and both recipes are vegetarian.

Ingredients

  • 1 medium cucumber, peeled
  • 2 pounds chopped tomatoes 
  • 2 or 3 slices bread, crusts removed, torn into small pieces
  • ¼ olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • Salt and black pepper

Steps

  1. Combine tomatoes, cucumber, bread, oil, vinegar and garlic with 1 cup of water in a blender until smooth.

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup honey
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ neutral oil
  • 3 cups granola
  • Optional: nuts, seeds, dried fruit bits, chocolate chips

Steps

  1. Combine the honey, sugar and oil in a microwave safe bowl; melt ingredients together by putting the ingredients in a microwave in 20-second increments
  2. Combine the granola to the sugar mixture
  3. Press the coated granola into an 8 or 9-inch square pan and let cool in the fridge
  4. Cut into rectangles to serve

 

The recipes seen here were inspired by Mark Bittmans cookbook, “How To Cook Everything”

by Ariela Brody '16
abrody@gm.slc.edu

Graphics by Nabila Wirakusumah '17
Web Editor
nwirakusumah@gm.slc.edu

SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

Brody visits the floating river marketplace in Bangkok

Originally a typical market place connected by an intricate network of waterways and canals, Bangkok’s floating river market is now one of Thailand’s most famous tourist attractions. Located on the outskirts of the city, this marketplace serves as an opportunity to revive traditional methods of buying produce and household items—a portal to a pre-Westernized paradise. Due to the over-commercialization of the marketplace in recent years the beauty of the spectacle is not so much the awing arrival upon the market, but more about the journey to the final destination.

Stepping off a rickety teak dock, one must step into a traditional Thai canoe modernized with a motor as it is whisked away down a maze of watery passages much too complicated for a newcomer to try to navigate. The boat seats hovering only slightly above the waters surface alter the travelers’ perspective, forcing them to look up at the combination of Western and Eastern style houses that line the passage. This twenty-minute journey into the market place gives the individual an almost voyeuristic peak into the everyday lives of the middle-to-lower class Thai people who gravitate to the river for bathing, cooking, thirst-quenching, or simply people watching.

Due to the way in which traditional Thai houses are built, the majority of locals’ lives takes place on open porches or kitchens, which allows travels the opportunity to see saronged grandmothers cooking up a savory lunch or wringing water out of sun faded pants. In contrast with some of the more traditional tableaus, the Western influence becomes more obvious as one passes by the ruins of houses lying next to industrial complexes which pollute the water ways. I even spotted an angsty teenager through a shutterless wooden first floor, hovering over Toshiba laptop and wearing a 90’s cartoon t-shirt.

As the boat journey progresses the river becomes narrow and narrower until a bottle neck effect begins to force the neighboring boats up against your own; this signals that one is getting closer to the market place itself. Contained in the stalls lining the canal are a combination of traditional Thai dishes as well as tourist souvenirs. Small canoes containing portable grills of chicken satay and steaming bowls of rice as well as pre-sliced tropical fruits such as mangoes, papayas, lyche nuts and coconuts approach, their owners trying to make a sale while bigger shops lining the shores attempt to pull you in with tentacle like hooks. If the shimmer of a Thai silk fabric or whole market priced saffron catches your eye, you may signal to the shops proprietor encouraging them to assist you to their stall. This is not your average shopping experience: one must maneuver their boat amongst the many. This requires much patience and determination if you wish to arrive at the stall of your choice. The overwhelming gasoline smells from the multitude of engine powered vessels as well as human perspiration can be at times overwhelming.

One simple pleasure not to be missed is the largest coconut ice cream stall in the floating marketplace, a very popular dessert in Thailand due to their abundance of sweet coconuts. Unlike any creamy confection the average traveler may be privy to, this ice cream is a simple 4-ingredient concoction of boiled coconut meat, coconut milk, ice and coconut water combined together and served in a small coconut shell. While more sophisticated venues may add difference pieces of fruit or additional spices in their ice cream the simple version sold off the side of a canal speaks to the idea that sometimes less is more.

INGREDIENTS

1 14-oz. can coconut milk
1 cup milk
cup heavy cream
1 cup shredded, unsweetened coconut
½ cup sugar
¼ tsp. kosher salt
1 tbsp. vanilla extract (optional)
 

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Bring coconut milk, milk, cream, coconut, sugar, and salt to a boil in a 2-qt. saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, until sugar dissolves, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside for 1 hour. Stir in vanilla; cover with plastic wrap, pressing it against the surface of the custard. Chill custard completely.

 2. Pour custard into an ice cream maker, and process according to manufacturer's instructions until churned and thick or beat with a mixer than freeze for 4 hours, repeat this process 3 times.

3. Transfer to an airtight storage container; freeze until set, at least 4 hours. 

by Ariela Brody '16
abrody@gm.slc.edu

SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

Munch on these guilt-free treats while Netflix binging

What does the return of House of Cards, Scandal, and Ice Hockey have to do with your eating habits? These addictive, dramatic shows call for comfort foods. Similar to the immediate thrill of a game changing plot twist, decadent snacks play into with your guilty pleasure. Later on, after some consideration you may feel unsatisfied or crave some more. Instead of accepting the added poundage and regret, try these lighter versions of your most indulgent snacks. Not only will these recipes leave you feeling happy and healthy, some of them have the added benefit of a full serving of fruit. Read on to discover some tasty treats that will not take away many calories.

Replace your favorite Ice Cream with Nutella Banana Ice Cream

Ingredients:

1 1/2 peeled medium bananas, sliced into coins and frozen until solid

3 to 4 tablespoons Nutella or other hazelnut-chocolate spread

Preparation:

1. Blend bananas blender until they are the consistency of soft serve ice cream.

2. Blend in Nutella, and transfer to a freezer container and freeze until solid.

 

Replace your Hot Chocolate with a Hot Toddy (21+)

Ingredients:

1 1/2 ounces brandywhiskey, or rum /or chai tea

1 Tablespoon honey

1/4 lemon

1 cup hot water

1 black tea bag

Preparation:

1.     Coat the bottom of a mug or an Irish coffee glass with honey.

2.     Add the liquor and the juice of the lemon quarter.

3.     On the side, heat water in a teakettle and add the tea bag to make hot tea.

4.     Pour the steaming tea into the glass and stir.

 

Replace your traditional brownie recipe with these Double-Chocolate Brownies


Ingredients:

Cooking spray

6 ounces bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 cup whole-grain pastry flour (or 1/2 cup each whole-wheat and all-purpose flours)

1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

4 large eggs

1 cup packed light brown sugar

1/2 cup plain low-fat yogurt

1/4 cup canola oil

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

3/4 cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Preparation:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Coat a baking dish with cooking spray.

1. Melt the chocolate and butter in the microwave in 40-second increments.

2. Whisk the flour, cocoa, salt and baking soda in a medium bowl. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs and brown sugar until smooth, then add the yogurt, oil and vanilla and whisk to combine. Whisk in the melted chocolate mixture until blended. Add the dry ingredients and mix until just moistened.

3. Spread the batter in the prepared pan and sprinkle with walnuts, if desired. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out with a few moist crumbs. Cool completely in the pan on a rack before slicing.

by Ariela Brody '16
abrody@gm.slc.edu
 

SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

These Chocolate Truffles are easy to make and very dorm friendly

As snowstorm after snowstorm hits our campus the pilgrimage to Bates dining hall becomes increasingly treacherous. Weather it be the narrowly cleared walkways or the ice coated hills. Some individuals, especially those from California, choose hibernation instead. Left to their own devices, some of us are forced to survive on cereal, cup o noodles or even worse forage in the often broken vending machines. If they have discovered the sullied oasis that is Hill-2-Go, their options may expand slightly. After four snow days, I bring you good news: If you have a microwave and a mini fridge in your dorm room you can cook. By cook, I mean stir things and assemble with minimum effort to create something delicious. The following recipes for lasagna and chocolate truffles are both easy and completely vegetarian (if you really like meat, check the optional section of the second recipe.)

 

Chocolate Truffles Recipe

Yield: Makes 30-40 chocolate truffles.

INGREDIENTS

Basic truffle ingredients

8 ounces of semi-sweet or bittersweet chocolate (high quality, 62% cacao or higher), well chopped into small pieces

1/2 cup of heavy whipping cream

Optional base flavorings:

Mint leaves (1 bunch, stems removed, chopped, about 1 cup)

Cinnamon and cardamom (1 cinnamon stick, 2 cardamom pods)

Amaretto (1-2 tablespoons)

Almond extract (1 teaspoon)

Truffle coatings

Cocoa powder

Finely chopped walnuts

Finely chopped almonds

METHOD

1. In a small, microwave safe bowl, heat the heavy whipping cream 50 seconds in 10-minute intervals till the cream is simmering.

If you are using one of the other recommended flavorings, stir it in with the cream (and ignore vanilla in the next step). If adding mint or other solids, after the cream simmers, remove from heat and let seep for an hour. Then strain away solids, and return the cream to the microwave and proceed with recipe.

2. Place the chocolate in a separate bowl. Pour the cream over the chocolate, add the vanilla, and allow standing for a few minutes then stir until smooth. (This chocolate base is called ganache.)

3. Allow to cool, then place in the refrigerator for two hours. Remove and with a teaspoon roll out balls of the ganache. Roll in your hands quickly (as it will melt from the heat of your hands) and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Place in the refrigerator overnight.

4. Roll in cocoa powder or chopped nuts and serve, or place back in the refrigerator until needed.

by Ariela Brody '16
abrody@gm.slc.edu

SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.