AVI Holds Baking Class For Sweet Tooths

SLC Fresh Executive Chef Jordan Luchini teaches Sarah Sargent (‘17) how to make a parchment pastry cone. Photo credit: Victoria Mycue '20

SLC Fresh Executive Chef Jordan Luchini teaches Sarah Sargent (‘17) how to make a parchment pastry cone. Photo credit: Victoria Mycue '20

Nine students shuffled into the kitchen in the few minutes leading up to 6 o’clock—the time when the cooking class began. The kitchen, located in the building 45 Wrexham, is where the SLC Fresh chefs of the AVI Foodsystems company have been teaching informal cooking classes to Sarah Lawrence students for the past two years. 

On November 30th, pastry chef Cassandra Moretti taught her first class: a “Winter Desserts” baking class. Also present was executive chef, Jordan Luchini, who has, on the other hand, taught a number of classes, among them pastry and bread-making.

“Usually, every semester we wind up doing two or three classes, just something to show you all some different things,” Luchini said. “This, I think, is about the third pastry class that’s been done.”

In introducing Moretti to the class Luchini said, “Cassandra is our pastry chef on campus, so basically any dessert that you get from catering, anything at Bates, she makes." After he noted that it would be her first time teaching a a class. A campus security officer, who was in the kitchen on a brief break from her patrol, playfully observed the novice teacher’s demeanor: “She’s nervous!”

Even if true, after Luchini's introduction Moretti proceeded to demonstrate each of the recipes. In conjunction with Moretti’s verbal instructions, printed and laminated versions of each recipe—Vegan Shortbread, Cinnamon Swirl Apple Pie, and Gingerbread Cookies with Royal Icing—sat on the table in front of the students.

Moretti guided the students through the preparation of each dessert, narrating the steps as she went along, and then passed out the finished doughs for the students to touch and examine. Luchini assisted in the steps and occasionally interjected with further advice for the cooking class attendees.

SLC students decorate holiday cookies in the Winter Desserts Cooking Class. Photo Credit: Victoria Mycue '20

SLC students decorate holiday cookies in the Winter Desserts Cooking Class. Photo Credit: Victoria Mycue '20

In true cooking-show-fashion, the SLC Fresh pair had pre-baked each dessert they demonstrated. Each student was given a slice of pie as well as a few shortbread and gingerbread cookies to decorate. One of Luchini’s tips was a lesson in making parchment pastry cones to be used in lieu of piping bags. Cooking class attendee Sarah Sargent (‘17) had a particular desire to master the parchment pastry cone and worked with Luchini to do so.

“This is my third or fourth time [here],” Sargent, who was the first to arrive to the class, said. “It’s really fun.”

Victoria Mycue ‘20

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SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

The Bronxville Diner: Epitome of Average

A burger and fries at the bronxville diner. Photo credit: parley cook '17

A burger and fries at the bronxville diner. Photo credit: parley cook '17

While the Bronxville Diner may take some getting used to, Sarah Lawrence students would be well-advised to make the best of its proximal presence. Yes, their prices are not ideal, and yes, they’re still working out some management kinks. Given the place has scarcely been open for a month, however, one could make the argument that its potential is worth appreciating. Such a variety of food options is, at the very least, a welcome break from the usual Bates and Pub routine.

The newest addition to the Post Road family of diners, Bronxville's is the first to be located outside the south-west edge of Connecticut. The original Post Road Diner, located in Norwalk, CT, was built in 1947 by Paramount Manufacturers. The interior design of Bronxville's diner, and its two predecessors in the expanding family, is modeled on that original '40s and '50s aesthetic. Space inside is at a premium, and will probably continue to be so until the diner's novelty dies down—assuming it will. 

When I arrived there for lunch on Saturday, the place was abuzz with the chatter of appreciative Bronxville natives. Conditions weren't quite at the line-out-the-door mania I observed when first arriving back to school, but they came perilously close. This was exacerbated by the table outside, where the restaurant was giving away free samples of pumpkin pie and mini glasses of milkshake. For any curious parties: the pumpkin pie tasted exactly like the recipe Libby's brand has been printing on its cans of pumpkin since 1950—decent enough, but slightly boring. This, in hindsight, turned out to be a good description of the food I would order, as well.

Many students have insisted that the diner lacks authenticity because it fails to stay open at all hours of the week. Many more are adamant that the Pondfield Cafe outclasses it, despite only being open from breakfast to lunch and being located off the main Bronxville path. I can't speak for the difference in food quality, not having been to the cafe myself, but a glance at photos of their menu does confirm anywhere from two to four dollar price differences for entrees and desserts. Only time will tell if the diner's prices decrease as their business settles into regularity and earns back its opening expenses. With a bit of luck, maybe they will join the ranks of other local businesses that have elected to offer student discounts.

In spite of quite a few horror stories about wait times and slow service, my experience was no different from any other crowded restaurant. I only had to wait 10 minutes for a table and around another 20 for my food, which was significantly eased by the diner's proximity to the Bronxville Train Station Pokéstop. It probably also helped that I knew what I'd be ordering before I arrived. The litmus test for any diner, even in our tiny, prim suburb, should be the quality of its burgers, fries, and shakes. If a diner fails those standbys, it's practically certain to fail everything else.

The two mini-cheeseburgers were served with “PRD sauce”, which turned out to be simple relish and brown mustard, and came with a side of coleslaw (not indicated on the menu) and a disappointingly small portion of French fries. All were prepared just fine, though the fries needed more salt. I thought ordering this nearly nine-dollar entree might be more cost effective than the six-and-change dollars burger and paying three dollars extra for fries. Given that I got about a quarter-pound of beef, rather than the standard third, it's a toss-up as to whether I was right. My milkshake, meanwhile, tasted like...a standard chocolate milkshake. I managed to fill up on that almost more than the food, but paying five and a half dollars for it definitely stung. I was thankful for the small mercy that they didn't charge extra for whipped cream.

The Bronxville Diner will probably survive, and perhaps even flourish, in a town full of people who tend not to spare expense. The establishment's cheerful, predictable atmosphere and greater seating space gives Starbucks a run for its money as a bland hangout spot. Without some considerable effort, the food will never be particularly inspiring, but arguably that's not what this town needs. The diner is already making its case as a solid, consistent, and more down-to-earth place to eat than the vast majority of its competition. It stands as a baseline, around which every other eatery can be contrasted to great effect. And let's be honest with ourselves: with the new weekend hours at Bates making Pub traffic hellish, we're going to be grateful there's somewhere we can go to get a straightforward hot meal.

Parley Cook ‘17

 

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SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

A Taste of Paradise

Puerto Rico. Credit: Ariela Brody ‘16

Puerto Rico. Credit: Ariela Brody ‘16

As the harsh winds of winter set in, the all-encompassing cold brings with it daydreams of sun dappled palm trees and warm ocean breezes. Though spring break seems far away and visions of the tantalizing tropics seem unattainable, with a little fiscal management and a lot of planning the vibrant island of Puerto Rico could be in your future.

The first step to achieving a tropical vacation is the purchase of a plane ticket. While this step is by far the most expensive and stressful, technology now offers some ways to cheat the system and find a ticket in your price range. The first rule is never travel when it is most convenient for everyone else. The cheapest tickets will always be for the most inconvenient times, whether that means during the nighttime, during the week, or the least popular part of spring break. When it comes time to purchase a plane ticket that follows all those guidelines be sure to look for your ticket under the incognito browsing option. Travel sites that offer discount tickets are able to track how many times you visit the site allowing them to hike the prices of the tickets they display to you when they can tell you are interested. Last but not least, my personal secret is the website hipmunk.com; this site compares multiple different flight deals, not only helping you find the cheapest offer but also the best airlines.

Now that you have a toolbelt of airline tricks, I will now try to persuade you on your destination. What if I told you there was an island only three hours away with an entirely different language, the only tropical rainforest in the United States, and warm sandy white beaches galore? Overlooked in past years, Puerto Rico is the ideal destination for those with not much money in their pocket but a great, adventurous spirit.
Whether or not you make it to Puerto Rico, recreate some paradise with the island’s answer to egg nog: coquito.

Makes About 7 Cups
Prep time: 5 min.
Total time: 5 min., plus chilling time
Ingredients
2 cans (12 oz. each) Evaporated Milk
1 can (15 oz.) Cream of Coconut
1 can (13.5 oz.) Coconut Milk
½ cup Sweetened Condensed Milk
½ cup white rum (optional)
1 tsp. vanilla extract
½ tsp. ground cinnamon, plus more for garnish, if desired
Cinnamon sticks (optional)

Directions
1.  In bowl or blender, add evaporated milk, cream of coconut, coconut milk, sweetened condensed milk, rum (if using), vanilla extract, and ground cinnamon. Blend on high until mixture is well combined, 1-2 minutes.
2.  Pour coconut mixture into glass bottles; cover. Transfer to refrigerator. Chill until cold.
3.  To serve, stir or shake bottle well to combine. Pour coquito into small serving glasses. Garnish with ground cinnamon and cinnamon sticks, if desired.

By Ariela Brody ‘16

abrody@gm.slc.edu

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SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

Is Burke's Restaurant and Bar the new go-to for Sarah Lawrence Students?

Burke's Restaurant and Bar has become increasingly frequented by Sarah Lawrence students this semester, garnering special events such as last week's Beer Pong Tournament. The winning team received a $100 bar tab credit. Photo by Ariela Brody.

Burke's Restaurant and Bar has become increasingly frequented by Sarah Lawrence students this semester, garnering special events such as last week's Beer Pong Tournament. The winning team received a $100 bar tab credit. Photo by Ariela Brody.

Located on 645 Bronx River Road, not far from Fleetwood Plaza, Burke’s Restaurant and Bar is the new destination for broke Sarah Lawrence students running out of drinking and dining options. Still relatively undiscovered, this Irish pub offers food and beverages on a budget with unbelievable discounts to students-- including their famous 8 dollar Mac and Cheese! By simply showing your SLC ID you can get everything from a 20 percent discount to free food.

Originally starting off their campaign to attract more college students with simple discounts, they have escalated to more enticing offers, most recently a $15, open bar on Saturdays from 10 p.m. to midnight. In addition to the open bar, there are $4 fireball shots and free burgers on Wednesday nights from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

While other colleges have multiple local hangouts, SLC has never had a go-to bar of its own. Burke’s, which is currently populated by locals, is surprisingly eager to add SLC students to the mix. The locals welcome SLC students as well as those from Iona College seeking some variety.

“People aren’t loving the open bar, people don't expect that they will drink that much. They would rather buy one beer at a time.” said Hayley Adams (‘15), SLC student and bartender at the establishment. According to her, the deals offered at Burke’s are surprisingly not taken advantage of that often. While the $15 open bar comes in handy, those that first enter the bar never believe it will be worth their while. Instead, choosing to take it one beer at a time, they run a tab larger than expected. For those that do not drink, Burke’s casual cuisine also comes at a steal every day of the week with a unique SLC discount of 20 percent off.

Those who have taken advantage of Burke’s open bar opportunities have also been greeted with additional surprises. Martin Blondet (‘16) recently won a free open bar, to be claimed any Friday or Saturday of his choice with an additional 50 percent discount for friends. Only a slightly farther walk than Kay’s, Burke’s Restaurant and Bar is a reasonable trek for mind-blowing prices. If prices are not enough of a motivation, the bar will begin to feature DJs from Sarah Lawrence this upcoming month!

by Ariela Brody '16
abrody@gm.slc.edu

 

Grab a cup of coffee somewhere other than the pub this fall

Slave to the grind is one of the traditional coffee-house haunt of Sarah Lawrence Students. Photo by Mary Katherine Michiels-Kibler '17

Slave to the grind is one of the traditional coffee-house haunt of Sarah Lawrence Students. Photo by Mary Katherine Michiels-Kibler '17

“Coffee” and “college student” go hand-in-hand, and Sarah Lawrence College students sure do love their hot, caffeinated beverages.  Although there are many places to get coffee on campus, especially with Sarah Lawrence’s newest addition, the Copyright Café, visiting the same spots day-in and day-out can become tiresome.  So, where is a student to go to change things up from their daily Pub coffee?

Have no fear! Here are the best places to get coffeew ithin walking distance of campus in Bronxville (in alphabetical order):

1)   Chantilly Patisserie – Chantilly prides itself on offering an intimate, traditional bakery experience with high-quality brewed drinks. A nice side benefit is that if you get a latte to stay, you can take break from the traditional paper cup and sleeve and get your drink served in a china cup.

135 Parkway Road, Bronxville; (914) 771-9400
 

2)   Park Place Bagels – For a good coffee/bagel combo, there is no better place in Bronxville than Park Place Bagels. While their coffee selection is even more limited than Chantilly’s, if you’re looking for a “no frills” spot to grab your cup o’ joe, Park Place is where to go.

9 Park Place, Bronxville; (914) 793-7114

 

3)   Slave to the Grind – Ever the popular hangout for Sarah Lawrence students, Slave to the Grind offers a truly vast selection of hot/iced coffees and lattes with a bohemian vibe.  Additionally, Slave is one of the few places in Bronxville to offer fresh, gourmet coffee beans to take home and brew yourself!

58 Pondfield Road, Bronxville; (914) 961-7777

 

4)   Starbucks – Although a coffeehouse chain, and on the expensive side (especially on a college student’s budget) Starbucks is the perfect place to go when in the need of a good specialty drink, with seasonal favorites such as  the Pumpkin Spice Latte (fall) and the Gingerbread Latte (winter).

29 Park Place, Bronxville; (914) 771-9103

 

by Mary Kekatos '15
mkekatos@gm.slc.edu


Where’s your favorite place to get coffee in Bronxville? Let us know in the comments section below:


 

 

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SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

GO VEGAN AT SLC: It's easier than you think

Participants in the People's Climate March, which took place on Sept. 21, 2014 in New York City, hold up signs encouraging participants to 'go vegan for the planet.’ Photo by Sarah Steinhart '17.

Participants in the People's Climate March, which took place on Sept. 21, 2014 in New York City, hold up signs encouraging participants to 'go vegan for the planet.’ Photo by Sarah Steinhart '17.

In the past few years, more people have noticeably chosen to adopt vegan lifestyles because of health, animal rights, environmentalism, or possibly to just be trendy as vegan restaurants continue to pop up in most major cities around the world. Although veganism has become somewhat of a fad among certain circles in recent years, I believe this change is due to the increased amount of information about animal products that has become available, not merely because it is a hip thing to do. Contrary to popular belief, going vegan does not mean severely restricting your diet, spending tons of money on every meal or that you are a pretentious hipster. When practiced through well-informed decisions, veganism benefits your health, saves animals from suffering inhumane deaths and dramatically decreases one’s impact on the planet.

    I have been a vegan for over four years. People often ask me why I chose to stop consuming all animal products after being a vegetarian since I was 12 years old. Basically, the answer is because I educated myself. I learned about the cruelty inflicted on animals in every animal product industry, the negative impact of animal products on human health, and how raising animals for human consumption is one of the top contributors to global warming. All of this information is readily available from research-backed sources online, so if you are interested in learning more, I highly encourage you to peruse the internet for facts. Here is a brief breakdown of the main reasons why most vegans choose the cruelty-free lifestyle.

    Animal cruelty. Many people are now making an effort to purchase meat, dairy and eggs with labels like “organic,” “free range,” “natural,” “sustainable,” etc. Unfortunately, these labels can be incredibly misleading, as most of them allow for a lot of leeway. Many farms meet the bare minimum requirements they need to fulfill in order to legally use these labels. For example, “free range” egg farms are only required to allow their chickens to roam freely outside at some point during the day—there is no minimum time requirement spent outside and no minimum outdoor space requirement. So while you may picture “free range” chickens enjoying the sunshine happily all day, sadly that does not usually happen.

    Dairy production is one of the most cruel practices of the animal products industries. On most dairy farms (including “organic” farms), calves are immediately taken away from their mothers so that the mother’s milk can be sold to humans instead of feeding their babies. Arguably, cow milk is not intended for humans—we are the only species on Earth that consumes another species’ milk—and, as all mothers’ milk is, it is meant to be consumed by the mothers’ children. Cows are constantly artificially inseminated so that they can stay pregnant and therefore produce milk for humans. Watching videos of the artificial insemination of cows is particularly brutal; the cow often screams in agony while someone puts their entire arm into the cow’s vagina in order to impregnate the cow. Undoubtably, this process is rape, although speciesism prevents us from seeing it that way.

 

Health. Because the meat and dairy industries are incredibly successful and control billions of dollars in the United States, they are able to perpetuate myths that most people hold as absolute truth. For example, contrary to popular opinion, milk is actually unhealthy and not meant for human consumption. Although we are taught as children that milk makes us “big and strong” because it has lots of calcium, drinking milk actually depletes the calcium in our bones. When we consume dairy, our bodies have to work hard to digest it, and we end up using the calcium already stored in our bodies to help neutralize our internal pH because milk is acidic. Milk and eggs also contain exorbitant amounts of cholesterol, and doctor-prescribed plant-based diets have proven to reverse high cholesterol.

 

The environment. Did you know that it takes 90 gallons of water to produce one Greek yogurt? Livestock and other animal product industries are some of the biggest contributors in the world to environmental destruction and global warming. In order to raise cows and other animals, we must feed them— using water and land to grow their feed and provide land for them—therefore cutting down thousands of trees and contributing to the destruction of the Amazon. Raising animals for food currently uses 30% of the Earth’s land and 70% of grains grown in the U.S. are currently used to feed livestock. By going directly to the source and eating grains and other plants instead of supporting the industries that are destroying the Earth, we can radically reduce our carbon footprints and do our part to help the planet.

 

Here are a few FAQs about veganism that I have been asked more times than I can remember:

    Isn’t it really hard to be a vegan? Living a vegan lifestyle is generally much easier than most people think it is. It is easy to consider what you cannot eat instead of what you can eat as a vegan. A lot of people’s favorite foods are “accidentally” vegan or can easily be made vegan. It is true that vegans do not consume meat, eggs, or dairy, but we do consume all kinds of fruits and vegetables, faux meat & dairy entrees--some examples include seitan chicken, tempeh bacon, black bean veggie burgers (available at The Pub and super delicious!), mushroom-based beef, and so much more—delicious baked goods (just swap milk for non-dairy milk and eggs for bananas or applesauce!), creamy and cheesy pasta dishes; honestly, you can find a vegan alternative online for anything you are craving. As long as you have the ability to cook for yourself (which a lot of us at SLC do), being vegan is a breeze. The only part of living as a vegan that is sometimes difficult is the amount of ignorance you find yourself surrounded by, so that you constantly have to explain your dietary situation to people. Also, sometimes at family events or friends’ houses, people may not understand your situation or have options for you to eat. I have never found myself in a very dire situation, so I either talk to people beforehand to find out what options are available or bring along my own food. Soon enough, your friends and family will hopefully come to accept the fact that you are vegan, and will not expect you to partake in non-vegan food. You just have to go through an awkward period before people get over it.

    Where do you get your protein? Most people believe that they need to consume much more protein than their bodies actually need, and research has shown that consuming excess animal protein is actually harmful to our bodies. Consuming the optimal amount of protein each day as a vegan is incredibly easy! I love to eat tempeh, quinoa, beans, nuts, tofu, nut butters, seeds, almond milk, dark leafy greens, whole wheat bread, hummus, avocados…and all of these delicious foods have healthy levels of plant-based protein. I also take some supplements every day (vitamin D, B12, and a multivitamin), but I believe that everyone (omnivores too) should be taking vitamins because it is difficult for anyone to get enough nutrients from our food nowadays.

    Isn’t vegan food really expensive? It is easy to see prices on vegan foods at places like Whole Foods and fancy vegan restaurants and speculate that living as a vegan is a seriously pricey endeavor. However, it is actually possible to live on a strict budget and still be a healthy vegan. Shopping in bulk and going to the farmer’s market for produce are key elements to saving money. A vegan can live healthily on cheap bulk items like oats, rice, beans, peanut butter, big containers of fruits and veggies, tortillas, and many other delicious, cheap items! Check out plantbasedonabudget.com for some ideas.

    Finally, some tips for those of you who are considering going vegan or just vegetarian:

1. Do research online. Learn more about meat and dairy health myths, how to be healthy as a vegan, search for easy vegan recipes, and reach out to other passionate people! Some of my favorite blogs include ohsheglows.com, theppk.com, kblog.lunchboxbunch.com, chefchloe.com, thesexyvegan.com, and choosingraw.com.

2. Watch these informative documentaries: Forks Over Knives, Food Inc., and Earthlings.

3. Take necessary supplements. My nutritionist told me to take B12, a daily multivitamin, calcium, and vitamin D every day. Just make sure that they are in vegetarian capsules and not gelatin!

4. If possible, see a nutritionist. Many doctors who are not trained in nutrition will tell you to avoid veganism because they do not understand it. I have been dissuaded from veganism by multiple Western doctors because they did not understand how I could get enough nutrition, but I also saw nutritionists who all supported my decision and helped me plan my meals so that I learned how to get enough necessary nutrients in my diet. After 7 and a half years as a vegetarian and 4 and a half years as a vegan, all of my doctors now claim that I am perfectly healthy!

by Sarah Steinhart '17
ssteinhart@gm.slc.edu

Joseph Gregory reveals the best places to eat in NYC

Mozza (far) and Tartare (close) set the table at Tartinery. Photo by Joseph Gregory.

Mozza (far) and Tartare (close) set the table at Tartinery. Photo by Joseph Gregory.

Much like registration week, finding the right place to eat in New York City can be a daunting task. What kind of food are you in the mood for? What time are you planning to go? How far are you willing to travel? You have 5 boroughs and over 16,000 restaurants to choose from (yikes, right?).

To attempt at making the whole process a little bit easier, I have compiled a list of some of my favorites, spanning various cuisines and neighborhoods. It is often my inclination when suggesting restaurants to provide an overwhelmingly long list. Yet, since my goal is to make things as simple as possible, I will keep this list as brief as possible.

Along with names, addresses, and short reviews, I have provided some other (hopefully) useful information, such as basic directions, Instagram accounts, my favorite dishes, and price indicators.

Guide in hand, all you need is an open mind and an empty stomach.

Bon appétit!
 

Nom Wah Tea Parlor-
13 Doyers Street
Metro North to Grand Central, 4/5/6 Train to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall or 6 Train to Canal Street
(212) 962-6047
IG: @nomwahteaparlor
$
Easy to miss but worth the search, Nom Wah dishes out delicious dim sum in a unique setting. Renovated to look like a mid-century Chinese tea parlor, this small Chinatown gem is a real bang for your buck. Located on the tiny alley-like Doyers Street, Nom Wah will satisfy all of your cravings in a no-fuss environment. While the service is just above civil, the food is fast and tasty.

Favorites:
House Special Roast Pork Bun
Taro Dumplings
Shrimp Rice Roll
Chinese Broccoli with Oyster Sauce

 

Ten Ren Tea Time-
79 Mott Street
Metro North to Grand Central, 4/5/6 Train to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall or 6 Train to Canal Street
(212) 732-7178
IG: @tenrenteatime
$

Save room after Nom Wah or skip it all together and stop by Ten Ren Tea Time. Part of the renowned Ten Ren tea franchise (the tea shop is located right down the block), Tea Time has an expansive menu of teas, slushies, and shredded ice that can (and should) be filled with tapioca pearls. If you are hungry, Ten Ren also offers a small menu of hearty Chinese “tea snacks” to go along with your drink.

Favorites:

Thai Iced Tea with Bubbles
Taro Milk Bubble Tea
Green Tea Shredded Ice with Bubbles
Green Tea Noodles
Ten-Lu Sticky Rice


Mira Sushi & Izakaya-
46 West 22nd Street (between Avenue of the Americas and 5th Avenue)
Metro North to Grand Central, 6 train to 23rd Street
(212) 989-7889
$$

You will find Mira in between Chelsea and the Flatiron District. From the outside, it might seem like a typical NYC sushi joint, but it proves to be so much more. Along with the traditional Japanese sushi bar offerings, Mira serves Izakaya-style bar foods that helped earn the restaurant a 28 out of 30 rating for their food from the esteemed Zagat restaurant guide. Alongside the familiar rolls and dishes, you will find innovative plates such as the Yuzu Chicken Wings, Kyoto Crunchy Sloppy Joe, and the Oyster Tempura Po’ Boys.

Favorites:
Tako Yaki
Pork Buns
Kobe Beef Hot Stone
Crispy Rice Sushi

 

Celeste-
502 Amsterdam Avenue (between 84th and 85th Street)
Metro North to Harlem, 4/5/6 Train to 86th, M86 (in front of Duane Reade on 86th and Lexington)(212) 874-4559
$$

Expect moderate waits and tight quarters at this cash-only Upper West Side institution. The generous portions of homemade pastas and sauces keep customers coming back for more. While you might have to yell across the table to converse with your friends, you won’t be doing much talking after the steaming plates of food are placed in front of you. Savor the food and the conversation at the table next to you that is virtually unavoidable.

Favorites:
Crostini Con Alici Marinate
Ravioli Con Burro E Salvia
Tagliatelle Con Gamberi e Verza
Pennette Mo Mo

 

Tartinery-
209 Mulberry Street
Metro North to Grand Central, 6 Train to Spring Street
(212) 300-5838
@tartinery
$$$

NoLiTa is one of my favorite neighborhoods in the city. It has all of the appeals of SoHo without all of the foot traffic. A block from the Spring Street subway stop (on the 6 line) you will find Tartinery, a charming French restaurant specializing in tartines, or open-faced sandwiches. While the tab can get a bit pricey, the tartines are large and filling, so I suggest splitting them or opting for the $13.50 Lunch Prix Fixe, which comes with a petit tartine and bowl of soup. Try and snag a table downstairs, especially for dinner, to fully enjoy the beautiful décor.

Favorites:
Ravioles de Royans
Asperges Avocat on Multigrain
Steak Minute on Sourdough (+$1)
Tartare on Country Peasant
Confit de Canard on Country Peasant
 

Rice to Riches-
37 Spring Street
Metro North to Grand Central, 6 Train to Spring Street
(212) 274-0008
$$

*DISCLAIMER* Rice to Riches can supplant a real meal.

It is hard to miss Rice to Riches—just a block from Tartine—with its ultra modern white and orange exterior. Walk inside and feast your eyes upon the largest selection of rice pudding you have probably ever seen in your entire life. Once the initial shock fades, browse the different flavors (ask for samples!) and plethora of toppings (you won’t need ‘em) and amuse yourself by reading the signs plastered all over the shop. “No Skinny Bitches!!!” and “Dozens of Delicious Flavors and 3 Shitty Ones” are two of my favorites.

Favorites:
Man-Made Mascarpone
“Category 5” Caramel
Sex Drugs and Rocky Road

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SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

BRODY'S RECIPES: Two easy, dorm-friendly recipes, no kitchen required!

With many dorms on campus lacking access to a full kitchen, it can be a hassle to feed yourself without submitting to the wrath of Bates. The heat wave this past week has only made the idea of toiling away in a steamy kitchen all the more unappetizing. While the gazpacho requires a blender and the granola bars require a microwave, neither recipe involves being a slave to the kitchen and can be accomplished in the comfort of your dorm room. If you can work up enough courage, for extra air-conditioned comfort, I have recently witnessed someone wielding a blender in the Pub. Though I am not sure how advisable that is, their ingenuity was admirable. The recipes below are perfect for the broke student on the go. All the ingredients can be found close to campus and both recipes are vegetarian.

Ingredients

  • 1 medium cucumber, peeled
  • 2 pounds chopped tomatoes 
  • 2 or 3 slices bread, crusts removed, torn into small pieces
  • ¼ olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • Salt and black pepper

Steps

  1. Combine tomatoes, cucumber, bread, oil, vinegar and garlic with 1 cup of water in a blender until smooth.

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup honey
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ neutral oil
  • 3 cups granola
  • Optional: nuts, seeds, dried fruit bits, chocolate chips

Steps

  1. Combine the honey, sugar and oil in a microwave safe bowl; melt ingredients together by putting the ingredients in a microwave in 20-second increments
  2. Combine the granola to the sugar mixture
  3. Press the coated granola into an 8 or 9-inch square pan and let cool in the fridge
  4. Cut into rectangles to serve

 

The recipes seen here were inspired by Mark Bittmans cookbook, “How To Cook Everything”

by Ariela Brody '16
abrody@gm.slc.edu

Graphics by Nabila Wirakusumah '17
Web Editor
nwirakusumah@gm.slc.edu

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SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

Brody visits the floating river marketplace in Bangkok

Originally a typical market place connected by an intricate network of waterways and canals, Bangkok’s floating river market is now one of Thailand’s most famous tourist attractions. Located on the outskirts of the city, this marketplace serves as an opportunity to revive traditional methods of buying produce and household items—a portal to a pre-Westernized paradise. Due to the over-commercialization of the marketplace in recent years the beauty of the spectacle is not so much the awing arrival upon the market, but more about the journey to the final destination.

Stepping off a rickety teak dock, one must step into a traditional Thai canoe modernized with a motor as it is whisked away down a maze of watery passages much too complicated for a newcomer to try to navigate. The boat seats hovering only slightly above the waters surface alter the travelers’ perspective, forcing them to look up at the combination of Western and Eastern style houses that line the passage. This twenty-minute journey into the market place gives the individual an almost voyeuristic peak into the everyday lives of the middle-to-lower class Thai people who gravitate to the river for bathing, cooking, thirst-quenching, or simply people watching.

Due to the way in which traditional Thai houses are built, the majority of locals’ lives takes place on open porches or kitchens, which allows travels the opportunity to see saronged grandmothers cooking up a savory lunch or wringing water out of sun faded pants. In contrast with some of the more traditional tableaus, the Western influence becomes more obvious as one passes by the ruins of houses lying next to industrial complexes which pollute the water ways. I even spotted an angsty teenager through a shutterless wooden first floor, hovering over Toshiba laptop and wearing a 90’s cartoon t-shirt.

As the boat journey progresses the river becomes narrow and narrower until a bottle neck effect begins to force the neighboring boats up against your own; this signals that one is getting closer to the market place itself. Contained in the stalls lining the canal are a combination of traditional Thai dishes as well as tourist souvenirs. Small canoes containing portable grills of chicken satay and steaming bowls of rice as well as pre-sliced tropical fruits such as mangoes, papayas, lyche nuts and coconuts approach, their owners trying to make a sale while bigger shops lining the shores attempt to pull you in with tentacle like hooks. If the shimmer of a Thai silk fabric or whole market priced saffron catches your eye, you may signal to the shops proprietor encouraging them to assist you to their stall. This is not your average shopping experience: one must maneuver their boat amongst the many. This requires much patience and determination if you wish to arrive at the stall of your choice. The overwhelming gasoline smells from the multitude of engine powered vessels as well as human perspiration can be at times overwhelming.

One simple pleasure not to be missed is the largest coconut ice cream stall in the floating marketplace, a very popular dessert in Thailand due to their abundance of sweet coconuts. Unlike any creamy confection the average traveler may be privy to, this ice cream is a simple 4-ingredient concoction of boiled coconut meat, coconut milk, ice and coconut water combined together and served in a small coconut shell. While more sophisticated venues may add difference pieces of fruit or additional spices in their ice cream the simple version sold off the side of a canal speaks to the idea that sometimes less is more.

INGREDIENTS

1 14-oz. can coconut milk
1 cup milk
cup heavy cream
1 cup shredded, unsweetened coconut
½ cup sugar
¼ tsp. kosher salt
1 tbsp. vanilla extract (optional)
 

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Bring coconut milk, milk, cream, coconut, sugar, and salt to a boil in a 2-qt. saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, until sugar dissolves, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside for 1 hour. Stir in vanilla; cover with plastic wrap, pressing it against the surface of the custard. Chill custard completely.

 2. Pour custard into an ice cream maker, and process according to manufacturer's instructions until churned and thick or beat with a mixer than freeze for 4 hours, repeat this process 3 times.

3. Transfer to an airtight storage container; freeze until set, at least 4 hours. 

by Ariela Brody '16
abrody@gm.slc.edu

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SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

Munch on these guilt-free treats while Netflix binging

What does the return of House of Cards, Scandal, and Ice Hockey have to do with your eating habits? These addictive, dramatic shows call for comfort foods. Similar to the immediate thrill of a game changing plot twist, decadent snacks play into with your guilty pleasure. Later on, after some consideration you may feel unsatisfied or crave some more. Instead of accepting the added poundage and regret, try these lighter versions of your most indulgent snacks. Not only will these recipes leave you feeling happy and healthy, some of them have the added benefit of a full serving of fruit. Read on to discover some tasty treats that will not take away many calories.

Replace your favorite Ice Cream with Nutella Banana Ice Cream

Ingredients:

1 1/2 peeled medium bananas, sliced into coins and frozen until solid

3 to 4 tablespoons Nutella or other hazelnut-chocolate spread

Preparation:

1. Blend bananas blender until they are the consistency of soft serve ice cream.

2. Blend in Nutella, and transfer to a freezer container and freeze until solid.

 

Replace your Hot Chocolate with a Hot Toddy (21+)

Ingredients:

1 1/2 ounces brandywhiskey, or rum /or chai tea

1 Tablespoon honey

1/4 lemon

1 cup hot water

1 black tea bag

Preparation:

1.     Coat the bottom of a mug or an Irish coffee glass with honey.

2.     Add the liquor and the juice of the lemon quarter.

3.     On the side, heat water in a teakettle and add the tea bag to make hot tea.

4.     Pour the steaming tea into the glass and stir.

 

Replace your traditional brownie recipe with these Double-Chocolate Brownies


Ingredients:

Cooking spray

6 ounces bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 cup whole-grain pastry flour (or 1/2 cup each whole-wheat and all-purpose flours)

1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

4 large eggs

1 cup packed light brown sugar

1/2 cup plain low-fat yogurt

1/4 cup canola oil

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

3/4 cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Preparation:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Coat a baking dish with cooking spray.

1. Melt the chocolate and butter in the microwave in 40-second increments.

2. Whisk the flour, cocoa, salt and baking soda in a medium bowl. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs and brown sugar until smooth, then add the yogurt, oil and vanilla and whisk to combine. Whisk in the melted chocolate mixture until blended. Add the dry ingredients and mix until just moistened.

3. Spread the batter in the prepared pan and sprinkle with walnuts, if desired. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out with a few moist crumbs. Cool completely in the pan on a rack before slicing.

by Ariela Brody '16
abrody@gm.slc.edu
 

Comment

SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.

These Chocolate Truffles are easy to make and very dorm friendly

As snowstorm after snowstorm hits our campus the pilgrimage to Bates dining hall becomes increasingly treacherous. Weather it be the narrowly cleared walkways or the ice coated hills. Some individuals, especially those from California, choose hibernation instead. Left to their own devices, some of us are forced to survive on cereal, cup o noodles or even worse forage in the often broken vending machines. If they have discovered the sullied oasis that is Hill-2-Go, their options may expand slightly. After four snow days, I bring you good news: If you have a microwave and a mini fridge in your dorm room you can cook. By cook, I mean stir things and assemble with minimum effort to create something delicious. The following recipes for lasagna and chocolate truffles are both easy and completely vegetarian (if you really like meat, check the optional section of the second recipe.)

 

Chocolate Truffles Recipe

Yield: Makes 30-40 chocolate truffles.

INGREDIENTS

Basic truffle ingredients

8 ounces of semi-sweet or bittersweet chocolate (high quality, 62% cacao or higher), well chopped into small pieces

1/2 cup of heavy whipping cream

Optional base flavorings:

Mint leaves (1 bunch, stems removed, chopped, about 1 cup)

Cinnamon and cardamom (1 cinnamon stick, 2 cardamom pods)

Amaretto (1-2 tablespoons)

Almond extract (1 teaspoon)

Truffle coatings

Cocoa powder

Finely chopped walnuts

Finely chopped almonds

METHOD

1. In a small, microwave safe bowl, heat the heavy whipping cream 50 seconds in 10-minute intervals till the cream is simmering.

If you are using one of the other recommended flavorings, stir it in with the cream (and ignore vanilla in the next step). If adding mint or other solids, after the cream simmers, remove from heat and let seep for an hour. Then strain away solids, and return the cream to the microwave and proceed with recipe.

2. Place the chocolate in a separate bowl. Pour the cream over the chocolate, add the vanilla, and allow standing for a few minutes then stir until smooth. (This chocolate base is called ganache.)

3. Allow to cool, then place in the refrigerator for two hours. Remove and with a teaspoon roll out balls of the ganache. Roll in your hands quickly (as it will melt from the heat of your hands) and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Place in the refrigerator overnight.

4. Roll in cocoa powder or chopped nuts and serve, or place back in the refrigerator until needed.

by Ariela Brody '16
abrody@gm.slc.edu

Comment

SLC Phoenix

The Phoenix is a non-profit, student-run publication representing the voices and opinions of Sarah Lawrence College community members. Our print edition publishes bi-weekly on Tuesdays, and our online edition is updated multiple times per week. Anyone may attend our open meetings at 9:00 PM on Wednesday nights in the North Room of the Pub.